More thoughts on GI Bill for Graduate School

One semester down and I’ve been already received¬†$47,387.35 in benefits. The GI Bill rocks. So for all of you academy grads out there who are deciding whether or not to stay in for an extra few months to get 35%, DO it.

When you see the 36 months advertised by the GI Bill it is actually more like 4 years because you are not in school during the whole calendar year. This means that for those of you who are interested in doing a 3-4 year joint-degree, you can max out the GI Bill. Although I don’t advise going down that route (basically the JD-MBA).

Generally speaking, most of you are looking at the traditional 2-year full-time MBA program and I’m a huge advocate of the¬†traditional 2-year full-time MBA program. You will exhaust roughly half of your GI Bill on this and I think you should put the remaining 18 months to good use.

Since you have so much time to use the GI Bill, I personally would consider going for a one-year mid-career policy degree (MPA/MPP) after a few years of working experience, if my career permits a one-year break. That would still leave a good 10 months of GI Bill left, assuming 8 months in an academic year.

What to do with the remaining 8 months? Don’t forget about the certification, licensing, and national exams! The Chartered Financial Analyst program is the most expensive to attempt (and possibly the hardest to pass) so I think it is great that the GI Bill gives you some cushion to try.

I read all over the place about the supposed “$1,460 = 1 month” equation in terms of how much benefit the tests will reduce, i.e. if your test costs exactly $1,460, it will remove 1 month of benefits from your 36 total. However, I haven’t actually found anything official from the VA that states that yet, so I’m going to submit a reimbursement in the next few weeks for the CFA and the GMAT and see how much benefits it reduces.

2 thoughts on “More thoughts on GI Bill for Graduate School

  1. Mike@ ebook shop

    Hi There Admin,
    Along the same lines,, I will be attending graduate school this coming fall. While relocating I’ve racked up some credit card debt. I intend to work while in college but for the first month I will be strapped for cash. I know you can only use your federal school loans for tuition, room and board, and other related expenses. Nevertheless, would be a problem if I used part of my loan to pay for this coming credit card bill?
    I’ll be back to read more next time

    Reply
    1. admin Post author

      Sorry for the delay. Any amount of left-over loan money goes straight to your checking account and you can do whatever you want with it.

      Reply

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